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Céline Condorelli + Artists’ Archives:
Raymundo Albano, Ha Bik Chuen, Ismail Zain, Judy Freya Sibayan, Carlos Villa

Céline Condorelli, b. 1974, Paris, France. Lives and works in London, UK
Artists’ Archives: Raymundo Albano, Ha Bik Chuen, Ismail Zain, Judy Freya Sibayan, Carlos Villa

Spatial Composition 13, 2019

Steel, fabric, wood and newspaper
Dimensions variable
Collection of the Artist
Singapore Biennale 2019 commission

National Gallery Singapore, Gallery A, Level 3
Informed by generous conceptions of the “architectural” as well as of “support,” Céline Condorelli’s works connect deeply with the conditions of coming together and ideas around community or constituency. Her works are interested in a dialogue between persons, things, ideas and predicaments in space. For the Singapore Biennale, she has created “support structures” that host the archives of five artists across various spaces in the exhibition. Her structures invite viewers to sit down, rest, face other people and get surrounded by varied material. Key in this convergence is Condorelli’s support that creates a hospitable, albeit ambivalent, environment of purposive and repurposed objects, which includes the furniture and the archives for both leisure and contemplation.

Here, Condorelli’s Spatial Composition 13 hosts the work of Malaysian artist Ismail Zain, in the form of a selection of his digital collages, as well as Philippine artist Raymundo Albano’s work, The Grid Escape. A selection of Hong Kong artist Ha Bik Chuen’s modified books are featured as well.

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National Gallery Singapore, Gallery C, Level 3
Here, Condorelli’s Spatial Composition 13 hosts four artists. Philippine artist Raymundo Albano’s Aleator comprises a suite of over 50 posters; Filipino-American artist Carlos Villa is represented by a montage of photographs from his 1976 exhibition, ‘Other Sources: An American Essay,’ and a selection of Hong Kong artist Ha Bik Chuen’s modified books are presented in vitrines. In tandem, Spatial Composition 13 features the artwork proposal of Philippine artist Judy Freya Sibayan, ‘The Other Biennale Archive, Archiving Biennale Artists Collectively, Openly Evolving to “DUMP (Detritus, Unused Materials, Past/Present): An Unrealised Project”.’

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Céline Condorelli (b. 1974, Paris, France) holds a PhD in Research Architecture from Goldsmiths, University of London. Selected recent exhibitions include: ‘Another Reality Awaits You’ at Eastside Projects (Birmingham, UK, 2018), ‘Zanzibar’ at Galeria Vera Cortês (Lisbon, Portugal, 2018), a solo exhibition at the Institute of Modern Art (Brisbane, Australia, 2017), ‘Céline Condorelli’ at Chisenhale Gallery (London, 2014) and ‘Archive of Disobedience’ at Castello di Rivoli (Turin, Italy, 2013). In 2016, she presented work at the Gwangju Biennale, the Liverpool Biennial and the Biennale of Sydney.

She is one of the founding directors of Eastside Projects, Birmingham, and is the author and editor of ‘Support Structures’ (Sternberg Press, 2009). She lives and works in London, UK.


Raymundo Albano (1947–1985)
was a painter, printmaker, photographer, critic, production and graphic designer, writer and poet. Apart from painting, photography and installations, he also engaged in video, mechanical-copy processes and performance art. His art was both an elaboration on and disruption of the modernist language, annotating turns towards the contemporary. Albano worked at the Cultural Center of the Philippines, where he organised exhibitions and managed publications. From pioneering conceptual possibilities to the urgency of his critical textual production, Albano’s curatorial and critical work offered crucial creative interventions in the art history of the Philippines in the 1970s.

Céline Condorelli’s Spatial Composition 13 hosts two of Albano’s works – The Grid Escape (1978) and Aleator, a suite of over 50 posters – along with a selection of his writings and texts.


Ha Bik Chuen (1925–2009)
was a Hong Kong painter, sculptor, photographer and craftsman. He had parallel practices of photographing exhibitions he attended, while collecting materials (including illustrated magazines and artist portraits) for the construction of book collages. He specialised in woodblock print, paper relief and sculpture and liked to use harmonious colours and simple compositions to reveal everyday objects in natural environments. A versatile self-taught artist, he received several prestigious awards over the course of his practice. Born in Xinhui, China, Ha moved to Hong Kong in 1957.

A selection of Ha’s modified books from the 2000s are presented in vitrines, hosted in Céline Condorelli’s Spatial Composition 13.


Ismail Zain (1930–1991)
has been described as a visionary of Malaysian computer arts. Using the computer to produce work as part of a new medium, Ismail Zain created digital collages and computer prints, opening a new pathway to digital art in Malaysia. He merged and juxtaposed images and text from varied sources in his collages to unveil new connotations on topics ranging from culture to social issues, economics, entertainment, religion and others. Ismail Zain held solo exhibitions at the National Art Gallery, Kuala Lumpur. He was born in Kedah, Malaysia.

Four of Ismail Zain’s digital collages from the 1980s, as well as selected texts by the artist, are hosted in Céline Condorelli’s work.


Judy Freya Sibayan (b. 1953, Baguio City, the Philippines)
is a conceptual artist. Former Director of the erstwhile Contemporary Art Museum of the Philippines, she has also been the Museum of Mental Objects since 2002, a life-long parodic performance. She has exhibited in museums such as MoMA PS1 (New York), Hayward Gallery (London) and Mori Art Museum (Tokyo). She is also co-founding editor and publisher of the online ‘Ctrl+P Journal of Contemporary Art,’ and the author of ‘The Hypertext HerMe(s).’ She lives and works in Manila, the Philippines.

Judy Freya Sibayan’s artwork proposal, ‘The Other Biennale Archive, Archiving Biennale Artists Collectively, Openly Evolving to “DUMP (Detritus, Unused Materials, Past/Present): An Unrealised Project”,’ is hosted in Spatial Composition 13.


Carlos Villa (1936–2013)
configured multimedia projects and performances called ‘Actions,’ and his works created a dialogue between the history of Filipino art and western art history. His poetic and political persuasions were informed by a heightened Asian-American cultural consciousness that spoke to anti-colonial struggles, the Black Power Movement and the Third World Liberation Front. He was born in San Francisco, USA.

Villa’s archives are represented by a montage of photographs from his 1976 exhibition, ‘Other Sources: An American Essay,’ as well as a selection of texts from ‘Worlds in Collision: Curriculums and Readings.’

For the full biography of Carlos Villa, please click here.